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Self-concocted, curious and creative coping strategies in movement disorders

      Highlights

      • Doctors often focus on disease, whereas patients want relief from illness.
      • Coping strategies improve health and quality of life in the face of illness.
      • Patients with different disorders may employ different coping mechanisms.

      Keywords

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