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Bilateral Hemimasticatory spasm in a patient with hypereosinophilic syndrome

      Hemimasticatory spasm (HMS) is a rare movement disorder characterized by paroxysmal involuntary forceful contractions of the unilateral masticatory muscles, predominantly the masseter and temporalis muscles [
      • Cruccu G.
      • Inghilleri M.
      • Berardelli A.
      • Pauletti G.
      • Casali C.
      • Coratti P.
      • Frisardi G.
      • Thompson P.D.
      • Manfredi M.
      Pathophysiology of hemimasticatory spasm.
      ,
      • Kim H.J.
      • Jeon B.S.
      • Lee K.W.
      Hemimasticatory spasm associated with localized scleroderma and facial hemiatrophy.
      ]. Brief twitches and often painful spasms can last for a few seconds to minutes. However, the mechanism underlying HMS remains unclear, although vascular compression or focal demyelination of the trigeminal nerve has been implicated as a possible contributor [
      • Cruccu G.
      • Inghilleri M.
      • Berardelli A.
      • Pauletti G.
      • Casali C.
      • Coratti P.
      • Frisardi G.
      • Thompson P.D.
      • Manfredi M.
      Pathophysiology of hemimasticatory spasm.
      ]. Studies have reported associations with focal scleroderma and hemifacial atrophy [
      • Kim H.J.
      • Jeon B.S.
      • Lee K.W.
      Hemimasticatory spasm associated with localized scleroderma and facial hemiatrophy.
      ]. We report a rare case of bilateral HMS in a patient with histopathologically confirmed systemic hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES).

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