Advertisement

DBS for dystonia: Should we take our patients to the swimming pool?

      Dystonia is a movement disorder defined by “continuous or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both” [
      • Albanese A.
      • Bhatia K.
      • Bressman S.B.
      • Delong M.R.
      • Fahn S.
      • Fung V.S.C.
      • Hallett M.
      • Jankovic J.
      • Jinnah H.A.
      • Klein C.
      • Lang A.E.
      • Mink J.W.
      • Teller J.K.
      Phenomenology and classification of dystonia: a consensus update.
      ]. Deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus interna (DBS-GPi) is used as treatment for patients with medication-refractory dystonia and has been shown to have long-term efficacy and safety [
      • Vidailhet M.
      • Jutras M.F.
      • Grabli D.
      • Roze E.
      Deep brain stimulation for dystonia.
      ]. Recently, several patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have been described who lost their ability to swim since they received subthalamic, thalamic or pallidal DBS. For this reason, we investigated the occurrence of swimming problems among our patients with dystonia who are treated by DBS. Here we describe three patients who experienced serious swimming problems since DBS-GPi implantation.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Albanese A.
        • Bhatia K.
        • Bressman S.B.
        • Delong M.R.
        • Fahn S.
        • Fung V.S.C.
        • Hallett M.
        • Jankovic J.
        • Jinnah H.A.
        • Klein C.
        • Lang A.E.
        • Mink J.W.
        • Teller J.K.
        Phenomenology and classification of dystonia: a consensus update.
        Mov. Disord. 2013; https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.25475
        • Vidailhet M.
        • Jutras M.F.
        • Grabli D.
        • Roze E.
        Deep brain stimulation for dystonia.
        J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatry. 2013; 84: 1029-1042https://doi.org/10.1136/jnnp-2011-301714
        • Bangash O.K.
        • Thorburn M.
        • Garcia-Vega J.
        • Walters S.
        • Stell R.
        • Starkstein S.E.
        • Lind C.R.P.
        Drowning hazard with deep brain stimulation: Case report.
        J. Neurosurg. 2016; https://doi.org/10.3171/2015.5.JNS15589
        • Waldvogel D.
        • Baumann-Vogel H.
        • Stieglitz L.
        • Hänggi-Schickli R.
        • Baumann C.R.
        Beware of deep water after subthalamic deep brain stimulation.
        Neurology. 2020; https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000008664
        • Morgan S.K.
        • Bangash O.K.
        • Benjanuvatra N.
        • Thorburn M.
        • Du Plessis I.
        • Jacques A.
        • Powers G.
        • Lind C.R.P.
        Deep brain stimulation and swimming performance.
        Neurol. Clin. Pract. 2021; 11: e698-e705https://doi.org/10.1212/cpj.0000000000001086
        • Serrien D.J.
        • Strens L.H.A.
        • Oliviero A.
        • Brown P.
        Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the supplementary motor area (SMA) degrades bimanual movement control in humans.
        Neurosci. Lett. 2002; https://doi.org/10.1016/S0304-3940(02)00499-8
        • Rosengren S.M.
        • Colebatch J.G.
        Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials are intact in cervical dystonia.
        Mov. Disord. 2010; 25: 2845-2853https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.23422
        • Baier B.
        • Vogt T.
        • Rohde F.
        • Cuvenhaus H.
        • Conrad J.
        • Dieterich M.
        Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius: a thalamic site of graviceptive modulation.
        Brain Struct. Funct. 2017; 222: 645-650https://doi.org/10.1007/s00429-015-1157-x